Home » Ethics » Brawls, Dolls and Bimbos

Brawls, Dolls and Bimbos

Combine the latest NBA basket-brawl, Trump not firing Miss USA Tara Conner for her alledged drugs and party lifestyle, and a shock while doll shopping to find a disturbing national trend.

Basket-brawl, NBA style

The Nuggets allege Thomas called on one of his players to commit the flagrant foul which started the brawl at Madison Square Garden Saturday night.

It was the NBA’s scariest scene since the brawl between Pacers players and Pistons fans two years ago. The league is still recovering from that episode, and Stern made it clear the players must learn to control themselves.

“We’re going to go after the players who aren’t able to stop,” he said during a conference call. “We have set up the goal of eliminating fighting from our game. We haven’t eliminated it completely.”

“I was very disappointed,” Stern said. “Clearly, we’re not getting through or players in certain circumstances just don’t want to be restrained. I would suggest that those players will not have long careers in the NBA.”

Suspensions in the latest NBA on-court brawl have been handed out, and as usual they’re far too lenient. If you’re making millions of dollars a year playing a game, it’s reasonable to expect you not get in fights during your employment. What other occupation allows you to continually get in fights and not be fired? If the NBA is serious about stopping fights (they’re not), a full year suspension is in order. Small fines and/or suspensions isn’t going to get it done.

But the NBA is hardly alone. While they continually have fights which spill over to the fan area, other sports have problems with drugs, spousal abuse, crimes and the like.

Miss USA Tara Conner

Trump said Conner made some “very, very bad choices” as she left a small town in Kentucky, getting “caught up in the whirlwind of New York,” and added that she would be entering rehab.

“There’s no question that she’s a party girl,” Trump told the Post. “We have hundreds of thousands of young women around the world who look up to Miss USA and Miss Universe, and it’s really important to set a high standard.”

Allegedly she has drug, alcohol and lifestyle problems. While we don’t really know (and will never get) the full story, it’s surprising she gets to keep her job in spite of all the negative reports — she’s supposed to be a role model for young women. And she is, but not the type of role model Trump had in mind (although he gave her another chance to clean up her act).

Barbie wasn’t like this!

The now-famous Bratz dolls — which imitate celebutante Paris Hilton, actress Lindsay Lohan and their pop-tart cohorts — seem to have just been the warm-up act. What an act they are: Dressed for a night of clubbing in hip hugger jeans and tight tank tops, these dolls reinforce the message of MTV and the cottage industry of celebrity magazines that being female means baring it all, sexing it up and being really, really tacky.

Be like Spears — the fading pop star who made out with Madonna on national TV and has been photographed in the last few weeks drunk, falling out of her dress and wearing no underwear.

Be like Lohan — actress and party girl, who at 20 attends AA meetings.

Be like the girls in the MTV videos, nameless bodies gyrating to the tune of another. Dress like a hooker, just because. (Needless to say, there will be no “washed up” Bratz girl doll — after she parties so hard she loses her career and respect of the public or ends up in rehab.)

Clinton-era White House Deputy Assistant Kirsten Powers was in a toy store looking for dolls, and what she found wasn’t your sister’s Barbie. These dolls follow the pop-tart model with “wardrobe malfunctions” and other assorted tacky attire.

Of course, Ms. Spears problems dressing herself are well-documented. But she’s hardly the only one in Hollywood suffering from this problem. Why is looking trashy (and beyond) so important for pop-tarts? And where are the feminists who remain silent in this race to the bottom? And most importantly, why do young girls look up to these poor role models? (All ladies are women, but not all women are ladies). Where has basic human decency gone? (For pop-tarts who have problems dressing themselves, perhaps a lesson on how to dress is in order?)

A Disturbing Trend

So what’s the common theme? A lack of personal integrity, ethics and old-fashioned decency. The trend has been downward for a long time, but really picked up steam during President Clinton’s abuse of the Oval Office with a White House intern. But his behavior isn’t the problem, it’s our reaction to his (and all the other) poor behavior. These people are reflections of society — if they act poorly, it’s because society allows (and encourages and rewards) poor behavior.

As shocking as these often-repeated stories are, nothing ever changes — in fact the trend continues its downward spiral. It’s time to make a stand against (what most people agree) is unacceptable behavior. Don’t support your sports team if they can’t conduct themselves as gentlemen, don’t buy records from artists who can’t dress themselves, don’t go goo-goo over the latest celebrity trash news (or what happens on Wisteria Lane), and don’t reward ethically-challenged politicians (from any party) with re-election who fail basic self-control.

This mess we’re in is our fault. We made them popular. We get what we want:

  • Companies produce toys people want. If they’re trashy and inappropriate, it’s because we want them that way.
  • Sports teams keep popular players. If they continue to play despite ethical and criminal problems, it’s because we want them to.
  • Music and other entertainment companies employ people who sell records and other products. If they can’t dress themselves appropriately and instead look like tramps, it’s because we want them to.
  • Politicians are reelected because we like them ethically-challenged.

If people don’t support them, they disappear or change behavior. Period.

We need a return to old-fashioned ethics, decency and integrity. These people aren’t the problem, our support of them is. If people stop attending NBA games because of fights, you can be sure the league (and the players) would take action. If no one buys music from dressing-challenged people, they will modify their behavior. If no one buys inappropriate toys, companies produce something else.

Athletes and pop-tarts have become the modern equivalent of Roman gladiators (with the Internet the modern Coliseum) — we wait for “wardrobe malfunctions”, whos-in-rehab now-they’re-out oops-they’re-back-in news, fights and courtroom drama. Are we to become like ancient Rome who lived only for gladiator spectacles? It doesn’t have to keep getting worse. If we as a society demonstrate we want better behavior it will happen. We can change this — it’s up to us.

But until then, it’s going to be brawls and bimbos.

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3 Comments

  1. Can some people deal with alcohol and other drugs better than others? WBR LeoP

  2. I don’t think anybody deals better – drug/alcohol addiction is bad for anybody. Some may hide it better, but it’s still bad.

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